Showing posts with label Back Track. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Back Track. Show all posts

Saturday, March 15, 2008

How to for List-Urls

How to for List-Urls

Disclaimer this is for education purposes only and not to commit a crime, you are on your own!!
All address have been changed!!


This is a quick guide to using the python script for List-Urls
This is a tool that I believe was written by Muts however I am not 100% sure of this.
To access this tool use the K menu Backtrack|Vulnerabilty Identification|Web Analysis|List-Urls

This opens a shell that looks like the following

Code:
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Extract links form webpage - v.0.1
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Usage : ./list-urls.py
Eg: ./list-urls.py http://www.whoppix.net

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
bt list-urls #
Now in order for us to use this we need a target website I will be using http://www.victimluser.com
Now lets execute this script against our target
at the prompt type ./list-urls.py http://www.victimluser.com
It should look like the following.
Code:
bt list-urls # ./list-urls.py http://www.victimluser.com
##########################################################
# #
# Extract URLS from a web page #
# email removed for spam control #
# #
##########################################################

index.html
news.html
lusers.html
victims.html
disclaimer.html
http://www.victimluser.com
bt list-urls #
Ok now we have seen what success looks like.
The next one shows what our target actually looks like since this is not a real target but a fake one.
Code:
bt list-urls # ./list-urls.py http://www.victimluser.com

##########################################################
# #
# Extract URLS from a web page #
# email removed for spam control #
# #
##########################################################

Could not reach http://www.victimluser.com !
Did you remember to put an http:// before the domain name?
bt list-urls #

DNSMap Tutorial

DNSMap Tutorial

This tutorial will show you how to use DNSMap


Disclaimer
: This is for educational purposes only not for committing a crime you are on your own!
All IP's have been changed.

Background: Dnsmap is a small C based tool that perform brute-forcing of domains. The tool can use an internal wordlist, or work with an external dictionary file.
Info: http://ikwt.dyndns.org/ This site seems to be down.
(Source http://backtrack.offensive-security....p/Tools#dnsmap )

Ok now to acccess the tool go to K Menu | Backtrack | Information Gathering | DNS| DNSMap


Ok it will open a shell and show you
Code:
dnsmap - DNS Network Mapper by pagvac
(http://ikwt.com, http://foro.elhacker.net)
Usage: dnsmap [dictionary-file]
Examples:
dnsmap yourtarget.com
dnsmap yourtarget.com yourwordlist.txt

bt dnsmap #
Once you have it open you can check the readme by doing a nano README This will provide lots more info.
Be sure to read it there are some limitations when using this tool.

Next we need to give dnsmap a target to search again we will use http://www.victimluser.com
so
Code:
bt dnsmap # victimluser.com
This will return us with:
Code:
dnsmap - DNS Network Mapper by pagvac
(http://ikwt.com, http://foro.elhacker.net)
Searching subhosts on domain victimluser.com

forum.victimluser.com
IP Address #1:192.168.1.1

mail.victimluser.com
IP Address #1:192.168.1.2

ftp.victimluser.com
IP Address #1:192.168.1.3

pop.victimluser.org
IP Address #1:192.168.1.4
Also you can create a wordlist.txt that you can supply at the command line like this
Code:
 bt dnsmap # dnsmap targetdomain.com wordlist.txt
This will force dnsmap to use a supplied wordlist to bruteforce subdomains if you do not supply a wordlist then dnsmap
will use the built in one by default.

The readme also give links to a few wordlist you can download.

Monday, February 18, 2008

Voiphopper How To

This is a small howto on installing voiphopper version 0.9.7

"VoIP Hopper is the answer to all voip solution providers who make people believe that VLANS is all you need to secure VoIP" - Sachin Joglekar, Sipera VIPER Lab

"VoIP Hopper is a GPLv3 licensed security tool, written in C, that rapidly runs a VLAN Hop into the Voice VLAN on specific Ethernet switches. VoIP Hopper does this by mimicking the behavior of an IP Phone, in both Cisco and Avaya IP Phone environments."

(SOURCE = Voiphopper readme.txt )

This tool was released at shmoocon this past weekend.

voiphopper

Download and save( I saved mine to "/root") Then use:
Code:
bt ~# tar xvfz voiphopper-0.9.7.tar.gz
This will "untar" and "ungzip" the package.
Code:
bt ~ # tar xvfz voiphopper-0.9.7.tar.gz
voiphopper-0.9.7/
voiphopper-0.9.7/Makefile
voiphopper-0.9.7/arp.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/buildmsg.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/cache.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/client.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/dhcpconfig.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/mac.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/netinfo.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/peekfd.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/signals.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/udpipgen.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/voiphopper.c
voiphopper-0.9.7/buildmsg.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/client.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/dhcpcd.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/kversion.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/mac.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/maclist.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/netinfo.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/pathnames.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/signals.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/udpipgen.h
voiphopper-0.9.7/LICENSE
voiphopper-0.9.7/README
Next "cd" to the directory where you saved it
Code:
bt ~# cd/root/voiphopper-0.9.7 #
and then use "make" to install it
Code:
 bt ~# cd/root/voiphopper-0.9.7 # make
You should see the following as the output
Code:
INSTALLATION
bt voiphopper-0.9.7 # make
gcc -c voiphopper.c
gcc -c dhcpconfig.c
gcc -c buildmsg.c
gcc -c cache.c
gcc -c udpipgen.c
gcc -c peekfd.c
gcc -c client.c
gcc -c arp.c
gcc -c signals.c
gcc -c mac.c
gcc -c netinfo.c
gcc voiphopper.o dhcpconfig.o buildmsg.o cache.o udpipgen.o peekfd.o client.o arp.o signals.o mac.o netinfo.o -lpcap -o voiphopper
bt voiphopper-0.9.7 #
Usage looks like the following:

1. To sniff for CDP and run a VLAN Hop into the Voice VLAN, simply run VoIP Hopper on the Ethernet interface, in the following way:
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1
2. VoIP Hopper also allows one to VLAN Hop to an arbitrary VLAN, without sniffing for CDP. If you already know the Voice VLAN ID, or would like to VLAN Hop into another VLAN (without sniffing for CDP), you can run it in the following way:
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -v 200
3. To Discover the Voice VLAN in an Avaya IP Phone environment:
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -a
4. To spoof the MAC Address of an IP Phone by sniffing for CDP (this changes the MAC address of default interface and new interface):
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -m AA:AA:AA:AA:AA:AA
5. To spoof the MAC Address of an IP Phone using an Avaya DHCP request (this changes the MAC address of default interface and new interface) :
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -a -m AA:AA:AA:AA:AA:AA
6. To spoof the MAC Address of an IP Phone by VLAN Hopping without CDP or DHCP (this changes the MAC address of default interface and new interface):
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -v 200 -m AA:AA:AA:AA:AA:AA
7. To spoof the MAC Address of an IP Phone without changing the MAC Address of the default ethernet interface (only spoof the new voice interface's MAC Address):
Code:
voiphopper -i eth1 -v 200 -m AA:AA:AA:AA:AA:AA -D
(SOURCE = Voiphopper readme.txt )

Well I hope that helps you get started
Have fun and play nice
This tutorial is not all of my own work credits to:
AUTHOR
Jason Ostrom
And the other Developers.

Saturday, January 19, 2008

How to Using Vinetto

How to Using Vinetto 0.06 (r56)
This is part of the Digital Forensics section of BT2 and 3
Note: If using BT3 and this tool doesn't work then please see the thread here: Possible bug

Some Background: Vinetto is a forensics tool to examine Thumbs.db files.
It is a command line python script that works on Linux, Mac OS X and Cygwin(win32).
Source: Vinetto

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime.
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!

OK you may be asking your self "why would I need this tool?" This tool and the whole "forensics section" of BT is one that the average person is not going to use. Now on the other hand if you conduct forensics investigation as either some type of "police official" or as a pen tester, then this tool can come in very handy for you.
Now there are other tools that can do the same basic thing however if you need it it's included.

NOTE: When doing any type of forensic work it is imperative that we do not damage the target computer in any way. Having said that we should boot our BT disk over our target computer using the "bt nohd" boot option. If you don't know what this means then stop here and go read about it here: Cheats

Ok in order to get this to work we need to go to the command line or alternatively through K>Backtrack>Digital Forensics>All>Vinetto
Now lets have a look at the options that are presented when we do a --help
Code:
 bt ~ # vinetto --help
usage: vinetto [OPTIONS] [-o DIR] file

options:
--version show program's version number and exit
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-o DIR write thumbnails to DIR
-H write html report to DIR
Now the output shows us only two useful switches -o will write our thumbnail to a given directory and the -H creates a html report to a directory
and these two can be combined like so -Ho this will give us both the thumbs and and report in html format. This is useful if we have a lot of thumbs to go through.
So far so good right? OK now for my example usage.

I booted BT over my laptop that has Windblows XP next I opened a shell and did a:
Code:
# find / -name Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Windows NT/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/RECYCLER/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/WINDOWS/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Microsoft Office Old/Office/Bitmaps/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db
bt ~ #
The above is a truncated version of the output, yours will be different. Our target file will be the last one, the "/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db"
So now you need to setup a storage device of some sort I used a usb stick seems to be the easiest. now go ahead and mount it and make a directory in it.
I used "thumbs" for mine. Ok now we have both a target directory and a "save location" we can go ahead and extract our thumbs to it.
so in a shell again give:
Code:
# vinetto -Ho  /mnt/sda1_removable/thumbs "/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Microsoft Office Old/Office/Bitmaps/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db"

** Warning: Cannot find "Image" module.
Vinetto will only extract Type 2 thumbnails.


Root Entry modify timestamp : Tue Apr 4 02:15:03 2006

------------------------------------------------------

0001 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 ORDPROC.GIF
0002 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 ASSETS.GIF
0003 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 CONTACTS.GIF
0004 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 EVTMGMT.GIF
0005 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 EXPENSES.GIF
0006 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 INVENTRY.GIF
0007 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 LEDGER.GIF

------------------------------------------------------

7 Type 2 thumbnails extracted to /mnt/sda1_removable/thumbs/
hit enter and you should see the same basic output as above.
This shows us the thumbs that we have recovered and the time they were created on our target and as well as their respective names.
Now we can go to our "save location" to verify our files are there. Also check out the .html output file as this is easier to manage then all of the other files.
I have posted some photos of the output if you need look at them VinettoOutput

And that's it, a simple program that can help if you need it.
Please leave some feedback if this helped or hindered you, Thanks

NOTE: Credit to the author of this tool and to the authors of THE BOOK
This is where I got most of the information from as well as the vinetto website.
I did find in my experiments that you need to use the flags as "-Ho" and not "-oH" doing so I got a "vinetto: error: incorrect number of arguments" error each time.

How to using NetDiscover.

How to using NetDiscover.

Netdiscover is an active/passive address reconnaissance tool, mainly developed for those wireless networks without DHCP server, when you are wardriving. It can be also used on hub/switched networks. (Source NetDiscover )

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!
All IP Address' MAC Address' etc. have been munged!


This tool will allow us to quickly gather IP address on a given network and as stated above work great in wireless networks that have no DHCP server.
I am using this tool in BT2 Final. However in BT3 the process is the same.
Ok so to gain access to this tool open a shell and type:
Code:
bt ~ # netdiscover -help
This will show us what flags we can use.

Code:
Netdiscover 0.3-beta6 [Active/passive arp reconnaissance tool]
Written by: Jaime Penalba

Usage: netdiscover [-i device] [-r range | -p] [-s time] [-n node] [-c count] [-f] [-S]
-i device: your network device
-r range: scan a given range instead of auto scan. 192.168.6.0/24,/16,/8
-p passive mode do not send anything, only sniff
-s time: time to sleep between each arp request (miliseconds)
-c count: number of times to send each arp reques (for nets with packet loss)
-n node: last ip octet used for scanning (from 2 to 253)
-S enable sleep time supression betwen each request (hardcore mode)
-f enable fastmode scan, saves a lot of time, recommended for auto

If -p or -r aren't enabled, netdiscover will scan for common lan addresses
Ok so let's look at the flags so that we know what we are dealing with.
"-i" simply put is the network card
"-r" the range to scan that you will insert on the command later
"-p" send no packets out on the network
"-s" time to sleep between the arp requests simply means how long netdiscover should wait.
"-c" count is the number or arp requests to send each time
"-n" node again this is a number you will insert on the command latter.
"-S" this will prevent netdiscover from "sleeping" between arp requests"
"-f" fast as stated above

Ok now in order for netdiscover to work it needs to send out "arp requests" this is the Address Resolution Protocol request. Simply put we are asking the network for a host's address.
For more info about ARP go here
ARPWIKI

So now if you understand the above we can move on.
What we are doing is asking a host some basic info about the network.
"Who has 192.168.0.1? Tell 192.168.0.67"
This keeps going until all the nodes or ranges we specify have answered.
When using I used wireshark to help visualize the process however this is not needed.The pictures are located here:
Netdiscover


Now we are going to look at an example of netdiscover in action
with no flags set. This will cause ND to scan for common LAN address'
Code:
bt ~ # netdiscover
Hit enter and watch
Code:
 Currently scanning: 192.168.4.0/16   |   Our Mac is: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC - 0

2 Captured ARP Req/Rep packets, from 2 hosts. Total size: 120
_____________________________________________________________________________
IP At MAC Address Count Len MAC Vendor
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
192.168.1.1 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC 01 060 Cisco-Linksys
192.168.1.2 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC 01 060 Cisco-Linksys
In order to stop the scan you can hit control + c .

We see above that we have found 2 hosts and the IP and MAC address's as well as the Vendor of said MAC's

Ok now we will look at some sample commands
Code:
bt ~ # netdiscover -i ath0 -r 192.168.1.0/24
The above is Set to scan a class "C" network to see what hosts are alive
Code:
bt ~ # netdiscover -i eth0
The above is Set to scan "common networks"
Code:
 bt ~ # netdiscover -i ath1 -p
The above is Set to scan passively

This means that it will not send ARP packets out but will wait for them to come from another source.
This is useful when we don't want to make noise and set off the alarms! This will happen on any good network with a decent IDS/IPS in place
because we are sending multiple ARP packets.
Ok so I have provided a few pictures of the tool in action and wireshark showing what is going on.

Netdiscover

Sunday, January 13, 2008

How To Using DNS-Ptr

How To Using DNS-Ptr

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!
All IP Address' MAC Address' etc. have been munged!



DNS-PTR Is a tool that allows you to learn DNS names of IP address' This is like doing a reverse DNS lookup.
You have the IP address but want to know if there is a domain name associated with it.
Using this tool will allow us to do mass lookups rather quickly.
This is a very simple tool to use.

To access this tool K>Backtrack>InformationGathering>All>DNS-Ptr

OK opening this will give the following
Code:
Usage : ./Allhosts  
Mass DNS Query program for vicy, by crisk
bt dns-ptr #
OK so for some background for those that don't know. DNS the Domain Name System translates Domain Names like www.yourexampleofadomain.com into 192.168.1.100
Of course this address is for "internal or private use only".
Now we can use lots of tools to gain this info I will leave that alone.
If you have maybe the IP address and want to find a domain name that may be associated with the IP we can use DNS-Ptr
Using the IP to find an associated Domain name is called a Reverse DNS lookup.

To use the tool on the command line type the IP address that you want to lookup.

Code:
Usage : ./Allhosts  
Mass DNS Query program for vicy, by crisk
bt dns-ptr # dns-ptr 192.168.1.1

The output will show us.


Code:
Beginning DNS lookups
192.1.168.1.1
Ending DNS lookups.
bt dns-ptr #
If we want to see if other IP address' close to our start IP are associated then we can set the End IP and run it again.

In this example I used 5 (remember leave a space)

Code:
Usage : ./Allhosts  
Mass DNS Query program for vicy, by crisk
bt dns-ptr # dns-ptr 192.168.1.1 5
Code:
Beginning DNS lookups
192.1.168.1.1 : fac34-7-yourexampleofadomain.com
192.1.168.1.2 : fac34-7-yourexampleofadomain.com
192.1.168.1.3 : fac34-7-yourexampleofadomain.com
192.1.168.1.4 : fac34-7-yourexampleofadomain.com
192.1.168.1.5 : someotherexampleofadomain.com
Ending DNS lookups.
bt dns-ptr #
As you can see the first 4 IPs belong to www.yourexampleofadomain.com, but the 5th one belongs to someone else.
Again this is a simple tool to use.

Multipart PortScanning Tutorial Part 5

Multipart PortScanning Tutorial Part 5

In this edition we will be looking at the results of NULL Scans.
We are using Nmap

The other parts are located here:
Part1
Part2
Part3
Part4

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!
All IP Address' MAC Address' etc. have been munged!


Ok first off a NULL Scan is a scan in which there are no TCP Flags set. This is normally something that doesn't happen or shouldn't happen in the "real world". If the scanned ports are closed then we should get a RST (Reset) packet back from our target.

The basic scan uses the -sN flag.

So it will look like the following on a windows box with a firewall in place.

Code:
 bt ~# nmap -sN -vv 192.168.1.4
As always we are using the -vv (very verbose) flags.
And the following is our typical output:

Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008
Initiating ARP Ping Scan at 11:35
Scanning 192.168.1.4 [1 port]
Completed ARP Ping Scan at 11:35, 0.01s elapsed (1 total hosts)
Initiating Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 11:35
Completed Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 11:35, 0.05s elapsed
Initiating NULL Scan at 11:35
Scanning 192.168.1.4 [1697 ports]
Completed NULL Scan at 11:36, 36.33s elapsed (1697 total ports)
Host 192.168.1.4 appears to be up ... good.
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.4 are open|filtered
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)

Nmap finished: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 37.093 seconds
Raw packets sent: 3395 (135.802KB) | Rcvd: 1 (42B)
And now the same scan without the firewall in place.

Code:
 bt ~# nmap -sN -vv 192.168.1.4

This time I will show only the info that is relevant.


Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.4 are closed
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)
Notice the difference? The only thing is that now the ports are showing up as closed! This is a huge bit of information.
We also learned in both that the host is "up" as well as the network interface's MAC address.
But most importantly we probably didn't set off any alarms on the target network.
Because I did this on my network I know that it didn't.

Now lets look at one more scan, only this time we will do it against a *nix box.

Code:
 bt ~# nmap -sN -vv 192.168.1.101
Again the output shows only what is relevant.
Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008

Host 192.168.1.101 appears to be up ... good.
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.101 are open|filtered
MAC Address: 11:00:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)

Nmap finished: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 36.094 seconds
Raw packets sent: 3395 (135.802KB) | Rcvd: 1 (42B)
This time we see that the *nix box showed the ports as being in a open or filtered state.

The advantage of doing a NULL Scan are no TCP sessions are created for this scan, it is normally quiet from the perspective of the remote device's applications. Therefore, none of these scans should appear in any of the application logs. This is a huge advantage when scanning a firewall or router that is facing the internet on a target network. These scans are also some of the most minimal port-level scans that nmap can do. For a closed port, only two packets are transferred. This is all that is needed to find an open port!

The Disadvantages of doing this type of scan are, Some implementations of the TCP stack will render this scan useless. For instance with Microsoft this scan will show all ports as closed regardless of their actual state. But even this can work to your advantage, since any device showing open ports must not be a Windows-based device!
There is another caveat to the above, Software based firewalls can override this rule, as shown in the first scan.

So now that we know what a NULL Scan can do for us or against us we should be able to better protect our networks.
Ideally and in my opinion we want our box to respond as being open | filtered as shown above. This makes it harder for an intruder to guess what the target is.

Sunday, January 6, 2008

How to Using Vinetto

How to Using Vinetto 0.06 (r56)
This is part of the Digital Forensics section of BT2 and 3
Note: If using BT3 and this tool doesn't work then please see the thread here: [url=http://forums.remote-exploit.org/showthread.php?t=10744]Possible bug[/url]

Some Background: Vinetto is a forensics tool to examine Thumbs.db files.It is a command line python script that works on Linux, Mac OS X and Cygwin(win32).
Source: [url=http://vinetto.sourceforge.net/]Vinetto[/url]

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime.
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!

OK you may be asking your self "why would I need this tool?" This tool and the whole "forensics section" of BT is one that the average person is not going to use. Now on the other hand if you conduct forensics investigation as either some type of "police official" or as a pen tester, then this tool can come in very handy for you.
Now there are other tools that can do the same basic thing however if you need it it's included.

NOTE: When doing any type of forensic work it is imperative that we do not damage the target computer in any way. Having said that we should boot our BT disk over our target computer using the "bt nohd" boot option. If you don't know what this means then stop here and go read about it here: [url=http://backtrack.offensive-security.com/index.php/Cheats]Cheats[/url]

Ok in order to get this to work we need to go to the command line or alternatively through K>Backtrack>Digital Forensics>All>Vinetto
Now lets have a look at the options that are presented when we do a --help
[code] bt ~ # vinetto --help
usage: vinetto [OPTIONS] [-o DIR] file

options:
--version show program's version number and exit
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-o DIR write thumbnails to DIR
-H write html report to DIR [/code]

Now the output shows us only two useful switches -o will write our thumbnail to a given directory and the -H creates a html report to a directory
and these two can be combined like so -Ho this will give us both the thumbs and and report in html format. This is useful if we have a lot of thumbs to go through.
So far so good right? OK now for my example usage.

I booted BT over my laptop that has Windblows XP next I opened a shell and did a:
[code]# find / -name Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Windows NT/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/RECYCLER/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/WINDOWS/Thumbs.db
/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Microsoft Office Old/Office/Bitmaps/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db
bt ~ #
[/code]
The above is a truncated version of the output, yours will be different. Our target file will be the last one, the "/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db"
So now you need to setup a storage device of some sort I used a usb stick seems to be the easiest. now go ahead and mount it and make a directory in it.
I used "thumbs" for mine. Ok now we have both a target directory and a "save location" we can go ahead and extract our thumbs to it.
so in a shell again give:
[code vinetto -Ho /mnt/sda1_removable/thumbs "/mnt/hda1/Program Files/Microsoft Office Old/Office/Bitmaps/Dbwiz/Thumbs.db"

** Warning: Cannot find "Image" module.
Vinetto will only extract Type 2 thumbnails.


Root Entry modify timestamp : Tue Apr 4 02:15:03 2006

------------------------------------------------------

0001 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 ORDPROC.GIF
0002 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 ASSETS.GIF
0003 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 CONTACTS.GIF
0004 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 EVTMGMT.GIF
0005 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 EXPENSES.GIF
0006 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 INVENTRY.GIF
0007 Mon Mar 22 01:00:00 1999 LEDGER.GIF

------------------------------------------------------

7 Type 2 thumbnails extracted to /mnt/sda1_removable/thumbs/
[/code] hit enter and you should see the same basic output as above.
This show use the thumbs that we have recovered and the time they were created on our target and as well as their respective names.
Now we can go to our "save location" to verify our files are there. Also check out the .html output file as this is easier to manage then all of the other files.
I have posted some photos of the output if you need look at them [url=http://picasaweb.google.com/Archangel.Amael/VinettoTutorial]VinettoOutput[/url]

And that's it, a simple program that can help if you need it.
Please leave some feedback if this helped or hindered you, Thanks :)

NOTE: Credit to the author of this tool and to the authors of the [url=http://www.amazon.com/Penetration-Testers-Open-Source-Toolkit/dp/1597492132/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198971560&sr=1-1]THE BOOK[/url]
This is where I got most of the information from as well as the vinetto website.
I did find in my experiments that you need to use the flags as "-Ho" and not "-oH" doing so I got a "vinetto: error: incorrect number of arguments" error each time.

HOW TO using HTTPrint

HOW TO using HTTPrint Version .301 in BT

Ok this tutorial is about using httprint to gather info from a webserver. We are going to use the GUI version; there is also a command line version that does the same thing.

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime.
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums.

Background: httprint is a web server fingerprinting tool. It relies on web server characteristics to accurately identify web servers, despite the fact that they may have been obfuscated by changing the server banner strings, or by plug-ins such as mod_security or servermask. Httprint can also be used to detect web enabled devices which do not have a server banner string, such as wireless access points, routers, switches, cable modems, etc. httprint uses text signature strings and it is very easy to add signatures to the signature database.
Source: [url=http://www.net-square.com/httprint/.com/]Httprint[/url]
To get the CLI use:
[CODE]
#cd /pentest/enumeration/www/httprint_301/linux
# httprint [/CODE]


Now first things first you should probably go ahead and update your "Signature File"
So it will usually be in: [CODE] /pentest/enumeration/www/httprint_301/linux [/CODE] look for signatures.txt
ok now to update just go to [url=http://www.net-square.com/httprint/signatures.txt]signatures[/url] and do a save as make sure you use a .txt extension. Overwriting the one we found earlier.

Next let’s get the input.txt file and set it up (its located in the same place as before)
This is the second file that we want to work with so and open it up using your favorite text editor.
Ok you should see something like:
[CODE]
# inputs for httprint can be:
# - individual IP addresses (default port 80)
# - http://servername:[port]/
# - https://servername:[port]/
# - IP ranges xx.xx.xx.xx-yy.yy.yy.yy
#
http://www.apache DOT org/ [/CODE]

We are going to be looking at the webserver over at http://yourexampleofawebserver.com/ so replace apache DOT org with it.
Note: You can insert as shown several URLS, IP Address or Domain names, we are only using one right now.
Once that is done go ahead do a save and exit.

Ok now let's start using the tool: K>BT>Networkmapping>All>Httprint Gui
Now at the top of the gui we should see our "Input File" and "Signature File" If they are not the ones we just worked with then go ahead and fix them now.
Now let's look at the option for "Input File". Notice that we have the ability to use Text files or an Nmap version which is a simple .xml file that you created using Nmap.
Note: using Nmap is outside the scope of this tutorial however it is fairly simple to do.
Next let's look at the middle of our GUI, We should see the following, Host/Port/Banner Reported/Banner Deduced/Confidence/
First up is the Host field, This gives us yourexampleofawebserver.com, next we have a port (the default is 80) and the last is 0.00% for a confidence rating.
This means nothing to us yet, so looking at the GUI you should see a green play button go ahead and hit it. This will start the process of info gathering for us.
Note: If you load multiple targets into your input.txt it may take awhile, and If you need to you can hit the stop button.

Once complete you should see our fields from before populate and a popup window should report that it is complete. Now we have some useful data about our target. You should see info about what the banner reported. (This may or may not be true; our server may be running MS IIS) For our example we see that our server is running Apache and it gives us some version numbers. Next is the Banner Deduced field. (This is what the server is actually running based on our signatures. We see that the program reports with 84.34% confidence that it is correct based on our signature file from earlier. It also gives us a symbol or icon as well.
Now You will also see some text data and hex, this is what got reported back from our server that allows for the deductions to be made. Further down on the left side we can see a listing of the different signatures that might correspond with the reported data. On the left side if it was present would be info about SSL analysis.
We don't have SSL running on our server so we see a blank instead.

Ok now let's move onto our Report File at the bottom. Right now it just shows where it will be saved at once we hit the floppy to the right to save. Also notice that it gives options for saving. I chose the .html format you can use what you want.
Now let's go look at this file. I opened the httprintoutput.html and It shows us information again about our server. This time the output is a little more eye friendly.

So now with this information we should know allot more about our target.
Httprint can be run with multiple targets, and ports to see what all is running on your target server. It's not just for webservers either, see above for more ideas.
Again this is just the basics to show you how to get the program up and running so that you can do your own fingerprinting.
I have added the link to some pictures of the output to look at as well but you don't really need them if you just use the program instead.

Using Dmitry in Backtrack

This is a small tutorial on using DMITRY in Backtrack.
Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime.
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums.

First off a little background info. DMITRY aka Deep Magic Information Gathering Tool is a GNU/Linux command line application that's coded in C.
It has the ability to give as much info as possible about a host. It is open source, can be used to perform Internet Number whois lookups, Possible to retrieve up time system and server data. The ability to perform SubDomain searches on a target. Perform Email search on a target, and TCP port scanning as well.
(Source http://www.moh-pah.net/index.php?file=projects/dmitry)
Ok now on to the tool.
There are two ways to access the tool either through the menus K>Backtrack>Information Gathering>All>Dmitry or from the command line, either way works the same,
[code]
#dmitry [/code]
OK now we need to be able to use the program so let's first look at the switches presented
-o allows us to specify with a given name our output the default is host.txt you could name it anything you want.
-i allows us to perform a whois lookup of the IP address of a host, this tells us that if we only no the name that dmitry will find the IP for us.
-w will perform a whois lookup on the domain name of a host.
-n will give us Netcraft.com information on a host (if you don't know about netcraft.com then go have a look you won't be disappointed).
-s performs a search for possible subdomains (www.yournetwork.com being a top level domain and www.yoursite.yournetwork.com being a subdomain.)
-e will perform a search for possible email addresses. (youremail@yournetwork.com)
-p will perform a TCP port scan on a host
*-f will perform a TCP port scan on a host showing output reporting filtered ports (useful if there is a firewall in place)
*-b will report to you a banner received from a scanned port (Note this will only work if the port sends us a banner when scanned).
(This may reveal some type of software running on a given port.)
*-t 0-9 is used to set the TTL in seconds when scanning the default is 2
The * means that the -p flag must also be set in order to work.

So now that we know what the flags mean let look at an example usage of the command.
[code]
#dmitry -winsepffb -o hosts.txt www.yournetwork.com[/code]

Ok so we see that we are going to use all of the flags available to us to gather as much information about our target as possible and write the info to a file called
hosts.txt The next part is the domain name of our target.

Now for the good part the first thing we will see is that dmitry is writing the output to our file.
Next we should see:
[code]
HostIP:192.168.1.1
HostName:www.yournetwork.com [/code]
Next we will see :[code]
Gathered Inet-whois information for 192.168.1.1 [/code]
You will be provided lots of whois info about the IP address
I will not print it all here for you but rather, whois should give you the Organization's name and address info. As well as info about the network itself
You should see the net ranges for example the netnames and their registration date.
Next you should see: [code]
Gathered Inic-whois information for www.yournetwork.com
---------------------------------
Domain Name: YOURNETWORK.COM
Registrar: The Registrars info here
Whois Server: whois.example.com
Referral URL: http://www.example.com
Name Server: NS1.YOURNETWORK.COM
Name Server: NS2.YOURNETWORK.COM
Name Server: NS3.YOURNETWORK.COM
Name Server: NS4.YOURNETWORK.COM
Status: clientDeleteProhibited
Status: clientTransferProhibited
Status: clientUpdateProhibited
Updated Date: 10-apr-2006
Creation Date: 15-sep-1997
Expiration Date: 14-sep-2011
>>> Last update of whois database: Sun, 23 Dec 2007 06:42:27 UTC [/code]
Again this provides more information about our target network. Now we have the names servers as well and the name of the registrar.
All of this is useful when we are "reconning" our target.
Next up netcraft with: [code]
Gathered Netcraft information for www.yournetwork.com
---------------------------------
Retrieving Netcraft.com information for www.yournetwork.com
Operating System: winblows server edition2007
WebServer: winblowswebserver v1.0
No uptime reports available for host: www.yournetwork.com
Netcraft.com Information gathered
[/code]
Now if our target network was using something other than the poorly coded Winblows Server Edition 2007
Then it might not get presented here for us. Same thing with the webserver info.
And because it’s so poorly coded we see that there is not uptime because it’s only on for about an hour before a reboot is needed.
[code]
Gathered Subdomain information for yournetwork.com
---------------------------------
Searching Google.com:80...
HostName:images.yournetwork.com
HostIP:192.168.1.2
HostName:maps.yournetwork.com
HostIP:192.168.1.3
HostName:news.yournetwork.com
HostIP:192.168.1.100
HostName:www.yournetwork.com
HostIP:192.168.1.1
HostName:mail.yournetwork.com
HostIP:192.168.1.5
Found 5 possible subdomain(s) for host yournetwork.com, Searched 1 pages containing 1 result. [/code]
And on and on until it has searched through all the subdomains that it finds.
Next we will see: [code]
Gathered E-Mail information for yournetwork.com
admin AT yournetwork DOT com
joeuser AT yournetwork DOT com
[/code]
And finally the output from our TCP scan [code]
Gathered TCP Port information for 192.168.1.1
---------------------------------
Port State
20 Open
21 Open
80 Open
[/code]
Etc, Etc, Etc, because www.yournetwork.com is running winblows server edition 2007 and left all the common ports open by default!
So I hope that this tutorial gets you going and you can start using dmitry to do some "reconning".
BTW All names and IP address have been changed to protect me!
If you feed in private block numbers like 192..... Then the data for whois will tell you that it is for internal network use only.
The only useful part of the entire scan will be port scanning!

Multipart PortScanning Tutorial Part 4

In part four of our "scanning journey" we are looking at FIN scans against our target box.
I am going to show you various combinations of the FIN scan and the resulting output.
If you have not done so you may need to brush up on the other lessons.

Part1
Part2
Part3

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!
All IP Address' MAC Address' etc. have been munged!



This is our standard FIN Scan. Again this is a TCP SCAN NOT UDP. I am using the Insane scan because it is a local network with the firewall and IDS turned off! So no need to worry about that.
Remember if you are doing this on a network that is not yours outside of the legality issues remember the faster you go the more likely you will be discovered by IDS/IPS (Intrusion Detection Systems/ Intrusion Prevention Systems). If a firewall was turned on then we probably won't get much in the way of information. However we will see that a little later on in this lesson.


OK on a FIN scan we are only sending FIN or "Finished packets" to our target. This tells the target who we prior to our scan did not actually "talk" to so in essence we are "finishing a conversation" or connection that never took place. This will normally net us some weird results. Sometimes the target can get confused and tell us more than it should! Sometimes it will not say anything and that it what a good hardened target box should do!

These probes are only using the default port list not the entire range of ports. All Scans listed are with the "-vv" very verbose and
"-T5" Insane speed level.

Code:
bt~# nmap -sV -T5 -vv 192.168.102
Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.102 are open|filtered
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)

Nmap finished: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 36.649 seconds
We didn't get much in the way of info with just the basic scan so we are moving on. This time using the version probe and the OS detection
Our command looks like this:
Code:
nmap -sF -sV -O -T5 -vv 192.168.1.102
And our output is as follows.

Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008
Initiating ARP Ping Scan at 11:43
Scanning 192.168.1.102 [1 port]
Completed ARP Ping Scan at 11:43, 0.01s elapsed (1 total hosts)
Initiating Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 11:43
Completed Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 11:43, 0.05s elapsed
Initiating FIN Scan at 11:43
Scanning 192.168.1.102 [1697 ports]
Completed FIN Scan at 11:44, 2.31s elapsed (1697 total ports)
Initiating Service scan at 11:44
Warning: OS detection for 192.168.1.102 will be MUCH less reliable because we did not find at least 1 open and 1 closed TCP port
Initiating OS detection (try #1) against 192.168.1.102
Host 192.168.1.102 appears to be up ... good.
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.102 are closed
MAC Address:00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)
Device type: general purpose
Running: Microsoft Windows 2003
OS details: Microsoft Windows 2003 Server SP1, Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition 64-Bit SP1 (firewall disabled)
OS Fingerprint:
OS:SCAN THIS PART WAS INTENTIONALLY REMOVED BY ME!!

Network Distance: 5 hops

OS and Service detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://insecure.org/nmap/submit/ .
Nmap finished: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 2.880 seconds
Raw packets sent: 1839 (74.156KB) | Rcvd: 1704 (78.744KB)

An now the same scan with a firewall in place.

Code:
Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008
Initiating ARP Ping Scan at 12:05
Scanning 192.168.1.102 [1 port]
Completed ARP Ping Scan at 12:05, 0.01s elapsed (1 total hosts)
Initiating Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 12:05
Completed Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 12:05, 0.05s elapsed
Initiating FIN Scan at 12:05
Scanning 192.168.1.102 [1697 ports]
Completed FIN Scan at 12:05, 18.93s elapsed (1697 total ports)
Initiating Service scan at 12:05
Scanning 1689 services on 192.168.1.102
Service scan Timing: About 6.42% done; ETC: 12:13 (0:07:17 remaining)
Completed Service scan at 12:12, 425.24s elapsed (1697 services on 1 host)
Warning: OS detection for 192.168.1.102 will be MUCH less reliable because we did not find at least 1 open and 1 closed TCP port
Initiating OS detection (try #1) against 192.168.1.102
Host 192.168.1.102 appears to be up ... good.
All 1697 scanned ports on 192.168.1.102 are open|filtered
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)
Too many fingerprints match this host to give specific OS details
TCP/IP fingerprint by osscan system #2:
SCAN(P=i686-pc-linux-gnu)
U1(R=N)
IE(R=N)
Network Distance: 5 hops

OS and Service detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://insecure.org/nmap/submit/ .
Nmap finished: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 445.304 seconds
Raw packets sent: 3419 (139.138KB) | Rcvd: 1 (42B)
Notice this time in the first scan we went from a possible Windows 2003 Server type box to a possible Linux box. The only difference was the addition of a firewall that was thrown in the mix. This can make a HUGE difference when we are looking for attack vectors!

This lesson shows you what FIN Scans look like. Remember that you can change some of the other options in Nmap to help evade and spoof IDS/IPS etc.
However right now we are only concerned with the basics.
In the next lesson we will be looking at a FIN|ACK scan.

Saturday, January 5, 2008

Multipart PortScanning Tutorial Part 3

We will now continue with our "scanning journey". In this installment we are going to look at another TCP scan using
BT2 as our target machine. I am also using the latest version of Nmap on a windows box.

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!


On our third installment we are going to look at out BT2 box. This is a fresh install of BT2 on a HDD. This will show exactly what it is others may see if you are running BT2 on your network. Now keep in mind things may be different for each individual setup possibility.

I used the latest version of Nmap it comes complete with a nice GUI if you are so inclined. I was since its on a windows box anyway! And yes you can get this for yourBT2 or 3 Box.
The only reason I did it that way is because I only have one BT Box setup right now and it was the easiest option for me. However If you have the option then go for it and post your results here as well!

So we used the same basic commands as before and it looks like:
Code:
 # nmap -A -v 192.168.1.102
Again this is still a TCP SYN Scan.
The output shows us the following:

Code:
 Starting Nmap 4.52 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008-01-05 22:42
Initiating ARP Ping Scan at 22:42
Scanning 192.168.1.100 [1 port]
Completed ARP Ping Scan at 22:42, 0.22s elapsed (1 total hosts)
Initiating Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 22:42
Completed Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 22:42, 0.05s elapsed
Initiating SYN Stealth Scan at 22:42
Scanning 192.168.1.100 [1714 ports]
Discovered open port 6000/tcp on 192.168.1.102
Discovered open port 631/tcp on 192.168.1.102
Completed SYN Stealth Scan at 22:42, 0.19s elapsed (1714 total ports)
Initiating Service scan at 22:42
Scanning 2 services on 192.168.1.102
Completed Service scan at 22:43, 6.02s elapsed (2 services on 1 host)
Initiating OS detection (try #1) against 192.168.1.102
SCRIPT ENGINE: Initiating script scanning.
Host 192.168.1.102 appears to be up ... good.
Interesting ports on 192.168.1.102:
Not shown: 1712 closed ports
PORT STATE SERVICE VERSION
631/tcp open ipp CUPS 1.1
6000/tcp open X11 (access denied)
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)
Device type: general purpose
Running: Linux 2.6.X
OS details: Linux 2.6.17 - 2.6.23, Linux 2.6.20-15-server (Ubuntu 7.04 server, x86)
Uptime: 0.050 days (since Sat Jan 05 21:30:36 2008)
Network Distance: 12 hops
TCP Sequence Prediction: Difficulty=188 (Good luck!)
IP ID Sequence Generation: All zeros
Service Info: OS: Unix

Read data files from: G:\Nmap
OS and Service detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://insecure.org/nmap/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 8.822 seconds
Raw packets sent: 1737 (78.040KB) | Rcvd: 1729 (79.864KB)
Now notice the output looks a little different, however all of the information is there. Since we used the "-A"
we get our services information in the output. This is some of the critical info that malicious users need in order to compromise a system.

Notice that we have TCP port 631 ipp open, with CUPS1.1 running.
Now for those that don't know this is the service for printing under *nixes.
This would allow users to print from the machine or remote users connect and print as well. Printing (with explicit permission) over a networked computer can be fun and malicious! A malicious user could connect to a networked printer and print out anything they wanted to.

We also see that we have TCP port 6000 open with X11 running but notice is say (access denied). This is the X Window System that allows out BT box to have a desktop.
This is a service because on *nix boxes we can have multiple users from multiple locations logged onto the box itself. And those other users can have a desktop and it can be customized to their liking. Also notice that our scan tells us what kernel we are running in this case 2.6.X

The OS details is for the Distro that we are running and this can and will be different. This data is not correct however because the "signatures that Nmap is using is not correct. At the end of the report we have an option to submit incorrect results to Nmap.

We also see the Uptime of 0.050 days, with a date. This can be very useful information for us. If we scan a box over several days or weeks we may learn that A. our computer is not very stable. B. It gets turned off at night or C. The computer is malfunctioning and needs to reboot.

This can be very useful when doing our pen testing.
A computer that is constantly rebooting may be having problems that we can take advantage of!

This scan gives you a chance to see what your BT box looks like on the net. This is how others may "see" you.

Stay tuned for more scanning in our next part we will look at a FIN Scan.

If this tutorial is helping you or hindering you let me know!

The other parts are located here if you need them:

Multipart PortScanning Part 2

We will now continue with our "scanning journey". In this installment we are going to look at another TCP scan using
BT2 as our target machine. I am also using the latest version of Nmap on a windows box.

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!


On our third installment we are going to look at out BT2 box. This is a fresh install of BT2 on a HDD. This will show exactly what it is others may see if you are running BT2 on your network. Now keep in mind things may be different for each individual setup possibility.

I used the latest version of Nmap it comes complete with a nice GUI if you are so inclined. I was since its on a windows box anyway! And yes you can get this for yourBT2 or 3 Box.
The only reason I did it that way is because I only have one BT Box setup right now and it was the easiest option for me. However If you have the option then go for it and post your results here as well!

So we used the same basic commands as before and it looks like:
Code:
 # nmap -A -v 192.168.1.102
Again this is still a TCP SYN Scan.
The output shows us the following:

Code:
 Starting Nmap 4.52 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2008-01-05 22:42
Initiating ARP Ping Scan at 22:42
Scanning 192.168.1.100 [1 port]
Completed ARP Ping Scan at 22:42, 0.22s elapsed (1 total hosts)
Initiating Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 22:42
Completed Parallel DNS resolution of 1 host. at 22:42, 0.05s elapsed
Initiating SYN Stealth Scan at 22:42
Scanning 192.168.1.100 [1714 ports]
Discovered open port 6000/tcp on 192.168.1.102
Discovered open port 631/tcp on 192.168.1.102
Completed SYN Stealth Scan at 22:42, 0.19s elapsed (1714 total ports)
Initiating Service scan at 22:42
Scanning 2 services on 192.168.1.102
Completed Service scan at 22:43, 6.02s elapsed (2 services on 1 host)
Initiating OS detection (try #1) against 192.168.1.102
SCRIPT ENGINE: Initiating script scanning.
Host 192.168.1.102 appears to be up ... good.
Interesting ports on 192.168.1.102:
Not shown: 1712 closed ports
PORT STATE SERVICE VERSION
631/tcp open ipp CUPS 1.1
6000/tcp open X11 (access denied)
MAC Address: 00:11:22:AA:BB:CC (Cisco-Linksys, LLC)
Device type: general purpose
Running: Linux 2.6.X
OS details: Linux 2.6.17 - 2.6.23, Linux 2.6.20-15-server (Ubuntu 7.04 server, x86)
Uptime: 0.050 days (since Sat Jan 05 21:30:36 2008)
Network Distance: 12 hops
TCP Sequence Prediction: Difficulty=188 (Good luck!)
IP ID Sequence Generation: All zeros
Service Info: OS: Unix

Read data files from: G:\Nmap
OS and Service detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://insecure.org/nmap/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 8.822 seconds
Raw packets sent: 1737 (78.040KB) | Rcvd: 1729 (79.864KB)
Now notice the output looks a little different, however all of the information is there. Since we used the "-A"
we get our services information in the output. This is some of the critical info that malicious users need in order to compromise a system.

Notice that we have TCP port 631 ipp open, with CUPS1.1 running.
Now for those that don't know this is the service for printing under *nixes.
This would allow users to print from the machine or remote users connect and print as well. Printing (with explicit permission) over a networked computer can be fun and malicious! A malicious user could connect to a networked printer and print out anything they wanted to.

We also see that we have TCP port 6000 open with X11 running but notice is say (access denied). This is the X Window System that allows out BT box to have a desktop.
This is a service because on *nix boxes we can have multiple users from multiple locations logged onto the box itself. And those other users can have a desktop and it can be customized to their liking. Also notice that our scan tells us what kernel we are running in this case 2.6.X

The OS details is for the Distro that we are running and this can and will be different. This data is not correct however because the "signatures that Nmap is using is not correct. At the end of the report we have an option to submit incorrect results to Nmap.

We also see the Uptime of 0.050 days, with a date. This can be very useful information for us. If we scan a box over several days or weeks we may learn that A. our computer is not very stable. B. It gets turned off at night or C. The computer is malfunctioning and needs to reboot.

This can be very useful when doing our pen testing.
A computer that is constantly rebooting may be having problems that we can take advantage of!

This scan gives you a chance to see what your BT box looks like on the net. This is how others may "see" you.

Friday, January 4, 2008

Multipart PortScanning Tutorial part 1

This is not so much a "How To" but rather a "What Is" The tutorials come latter.

Today we will be talking about Port Scanning and what it is.

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only and not to commit a crime!
If you do something that causes you to hose your box don't come kicking and screaming on the forums!

Port Scanning is like a car thief walking around a busy parking lot and trying to find cars that are unlocked.
However on our computer or network. This can sometimes be bad if we leave the "doors" (ports) "unlocked" (open). When we leave ports open on the Internet it is not "if" someone will find it but "when". Port scanning software like [url=http://insecure.org/nmap/]Nmap[/url] Allows anyone to scan computers connected to a network. This can be done simply by the program sending out a request to connect to a target computer. Then it waits to see which port(s) responds or seems to be open so that it can be studied latter more in depth. Sometimes a computer doesn't respond and this information can be useful too. We will cover that more in depth latter.

When a scanner is looking for ports on a target computer it has two choices for port type. First is TCP which is the Transmission Control Protocol.This is simply the "rule set" by which data is exchanged over a network. This data exchange is bytes of data that are called packets. These packets normally consist of a "Header" and a "body". The header is the "address" of where the packet is going to. This is used by routers on a network to send the data along its way. The "body" is the information that has been sent. Think of it as a letter to grandma first you have the envelope which is the packet. You have the address to grandma which is the header, And finally you have the letter itself, which is the body of the packet. It doesn't really matter which order these packets arrive at its destination because the computer on the receiving end can put them back together in the right order.

Now UDP on the other hand does not guarantee reliability or ordering in the way that TCP does. This means that the packets can arrive out of order, they can be duplicated or become missing without notice. This sometimes makes UDP faster than TCP. We will talk more about UDP later on.

Back to port scanning. When we scan ports we have up to 65,535 to choose from. This is the same for TCP and UDP. Thats a lot of doors for us to lock and make sure they stay locked.

The first 1024 TCP ports are called the Well-Known Ports and are associated with standard services such as FTP, HTTP, SMTP or DNS.
The Registered Ports are those in the range 1024–49151.
The Dynamic and/or Private Ports are those in the range 49152–65535. Randomly chosen port numbers out of this range are called ephemeral ports. These ports are not permanently assigned to any publicly defined application.

If a port scan is being done with malicious intent, an attacker normally wants to go undetected. Network security applications can be configured to alert administrators if they detect connection requests across a broad range of ports from a single host. To get around this an attacker can do the port scan in strobe or stealth mode. Strobing limits the ports to a smaller target set rather than blanket scanning all 65535 ports. Stealth scanning uses techniques such as slowing the scan down. By scanning the ports over a much longer period of time we can better evade IDS. Although this is not always the case!

By setting different TCP flags or sending different types of packets a port scan can generate different results or locate open ports in different ways. A SYN scan will tell the port scanner which ports are listening and which are not depending on the type of response generated. This is normally accomplished by a Three-Way Handshake.
First we have the Syn Packet sent from a computer wishing to connect to another saying "let's connect". Then the computer we wish to connect to says with a SYN-ACK "ok let's connect".Then we would send another ACK back saying "ok". At this point the two computers would be "connected". If the port however was closed then we normally wouldn't get any response back.

In the next few segments we will be looking at the output of some various scans on our target machine. We will be using nmap to do this.
So until then go and read up on nmap so that you have a basic understanding of the tool.